Author: Karthika Sasikumar

Karthika Sasikumar is an associate professor of political
science at San Jose State University and an affiliate of the
Center for International Security and Cooperation at
Stanford University. Previously, she was a program associate
at the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and an
associate in the International Security Program at Harvard
University’s Kennedy School of Government. She began her
education in India, where she earned master’s and MPhil
degrees from the School of International Studies in New
Delhi. She received her PhD from the Department of
Government at Cornell University.

February 26, 2019 /

Sometimes it is important to think about the unthinkable. Although South Asia has been called “the most dangerous place in the world” by many, the discourse in those countries, and elsewhere, about the potential aftermath of a nuclear exchange between India and Pakistan has been remarkably muted. What would these two enduring rivals, home to more than a sixth of the world’s population, look like after a nuclear exchange?

February 26, 2019 /

Sometimes it is important to think about the unthinkable. Although South Asia has been called “the most dangerous place in the world” by many, the discourse in those countries, and elsewhere, about the potential aftermath of a nuclear exchange between India and Pakistan has been remarkably muted. What would these two enduring rivals, home to more than a sixth of the world’s population, look like after a nuclear exchange?